2018 Chino Kaori Memorial Essay Prize for Graduate Students

Japan Art History Forum (JAHF) is pleased to announce the fifteenth annual Chino Kaori Memorial Essay Prize competition. Established in 2003 in memory of the distinguished art historian Chino Kaori, the prize is awarded annually to a graduate student who has written an outstanding essay in English on a topic in the study of Japanese art history or visual culture. The award recognizes excellence in scholarship, with many past prize-winning essays later published in peer-reviewed journals. For more about past Chino Kaori Prize essays, please go to: http://jahf.net/chinokaori

Thanks to a generous gift from the Japanese Art Society of America (JASA), the winner of this year’s competition will receive a prize of $1,000 from JASA.

The prize is also generously supported by the University of Hawai’i Press. The prize recipient will be awarded $250 in books from the University of Hawai’i Press catalogue as well as a complimentary two-year membership to JAHF.

The competition is open to graduate students from any university. Submissions should include an essay, abstract, and illustrations (see Submission Guidelines below). Essays may not be previously published in any form or currently under review for publication.

Submission Guidelines

– Abstract: 250 words.
– Essay: under 10,000 words (13,000 including notes), in 12 pt., double-spaced font.
– Illustrations: size of the total file must be under 10MB.
– Please send the above three items in a single Word file. If you are unable to use Word please contact JAHF Secretary, Justin Jesty, to make other arrangements.

* The deadline for submission July 15, 2018. *
* Please send submissions to Justin Jesty, JAHF Secretary, at justin.jesty@gmail.com

Submissions that do not meet the above specifications will not be accepted. The recipient of the prize will be announced in August. We will post an abstract of the prize winning paper on the JAHF website.

The 2018 Committee is looking forward to your submissions.


Cecile Laly

CREOPS (Université Paris-Sorbonne), International Research Center for Japanese Studies

Vous aimerez aussi...